East Africa News Post

Complete News World

This is not goodbye, Pablo Milanes

This is not goodbye, Pablo Milanes

Honoring Pablo Milanes at the Cuba Pavilion. Photo: Thalia Fuentes/Copadebat.

Sometimes I think about what immortality means or if the purpose of life is to achieve it. On many occasions I wonder how much effort should be made to “overcome” or leave a legacy, no matter how utopian the concept may seem.

I think and find no answer, or one that I find too philosophical, but then, beings of light arrive like Pablo Milanes who break away from all meanings of words and win, by perseverance and talent, that long-awaited place in posterity. And I’m not saying that, but hundreds of people on Tuesday afternoons chanted his songs as if Pablo was still here, vibrating with every note.

Pancho Amat’s tres strings, together with the guitar and the voice of Eduardo Sosa, started a tribute to Pablo at the Cuba Pavilion, headquarters of the Hermanos Saez Association.

Later, the troubadour Pepe Ordaz, an exponent of the Nueva Trova movement, joined in, and together they performed “Where Does Love Come From?” , which is one of the most heartfelt songs, was written by Ordaz, and sung by Pablo.

Raul Torres played “Se fue” and “El breve espacio en que no estas”, a song released by Pablo in 1984 as part of the album The beginning and end of a green morning.

Honoring Pablo Milanes at the Cuba Pavilion. Photo: Thalia Fuentes/Copadebat.

“Although it has already been said, it is not without weight: it is an irreparable loss for Cuban culture,” he said. cube Tony Avila.

“There is no way to replace Pablo Milanes.”

The singer-songwriter has confirmed that most Cuban musicians are influenced by Pablo and Silvio Rodriguez. “There were two pillars, the boundary between the traditional trova and the connection between the traditional song and the new song”.

See also  With the sea in the background: Ricardo Arjona's daughter showed her perfect figure and paralyzed social networks

He highlighted Pablo and Silvio’s ability to understand and read their time and to do so through songs that documented Cuban reality. Pablo is a symbol – as Avila said – and although the trova is not for performers but for composers, He had the pleasure of owning the tremendous combination of sound and composition.

For her part, Heidi Igualada, a prominent Cuban composer, guitarist and vocalist, member of the Nueva Trova movement, said that Milanese’s influence lies in her singing and playing style, as in all the troubadour of her generation. And with his voice full of nuances, he was part of this tribute turned song.

The crowd that came to the Cuba Pavilion chanted “Candel de Nieve”, “This era is over”, “It wasn’t easy” and “The place you’re not”.

Eric Mendes, Ray Fernandez, Abel Acosta, Pancho Amat, Cesar Lopez, Ariel Diaz, Abel Gerones, Ani Garces, Adrian Perazin, Rodrigo García, Rochi Aminieros, Gerardo Alfonso, duo Iris, Augusto Blanca, Frank Fernandez Valle Maraca and Christopher Simpson also went To honor Pablo. Some played, others sang, or simply felt each letter sung from the heart.

On PM Records, located on Calle 11 between J and I, the people of Cuba paid tribute to the outstanding musician. Tomorrow, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the office will be open for that Anyone who wishes can sign a book of condolences and dedicate a few words to Pablo.

There are times when it is better not to define things, but if it is necessary to do so with the work that the Milanese have left to the Cuban people and their culture, the right words would be “a legacy full of sensitivity.” Pablo is Cuba. Cuba is Pablo.

Honoring Pablo Milanes at the Cuba Pavilion. Photo: Thalia Fuentes/Copadebat.

Honoring Pablo Milanes at the Cuba Pavilion. Photo: Thalia Fuentes/Copadebat.

Honoring Pablo Milanes at the Cuba Pavilion. Photo: Thalia Fuentes/Copadebat.

Honoring Pablo Milanes at the Cuba Pavilion. Photo: Thalia Fuentes/Copadebat.

Honoring Pablo Milanes at the Cuba Pavilion. Photo: Thalia Fuentes/Copadebat.

Video tribute to Pablo Milanes

https://fb.watch/gZqCrx3dzK/

See also  Jesse Uribe: The car that the singer bought in the United States - people - culture

See also:

Pablo and that likes to live