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NYC Considers Possible Curfew for Immigrants in Shelters – Telemundo New York (47)

NYC Considers Possible Curfew for Immigrants in Shelters – Telemundo New York (47)

What you need to know

  • New York City is considering a possible curfew for immigrants currently staying in city shelters.
  • It is the latest attempt to reduce symptoms of the migration crisis, particularly as asylum seekers go door-to-door asking for money and food.
  • Residents in surrounding neighborhoods said they now see migrants knocking on doors and asking for money, clothes, baby items and food.

NEW YORK — New York City is considering a possible curfew for immigrants currently staying in city shelters.

It is the latest attempt to reduce symptoms of the migration crisis, particularly as asylum seekers go door-to-door asking for money and food.

The latest development comes in the wake of the controversial tents used by the city to house Floyd Bennett Field, which many say is not family-friendly.

“I feel sorry for them,” Flatlands resident Nelson Tung said. “The situation they are in is very sad and it is very difficult in the city at the moment.”

Residents in surrounding neighborhoods said they now see migrants knocking on doors and asking for money, clothes, baby items and food. According to New York City Councilwoman Joan Arriola, it happens at night, which is why she's pushing for an 11 p.m. curfew on all immigrant shelters. Arriola said Mayor Eric Adams' office may agree to the plan.

“I've mentioned it many times before, but this is the first time the response has been, 'We're looking at it.' So I'm very encouraged,” he said.

Currently, migrants can come and go as they please, but rely on buses to take them to and from far-flung places of refuge.

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In Flatlands, NBC heard from a dozen people in New York who said immigrant mothers with children often knock on their doors during the day, and they want it to stop. None of them agreed to be interviewed on camera, but they all questioned how the curfew would help what they call a daylight problem. Meanwhile, supporters of the curfew point out that other homeless New Yorkers already have it.

“We're not asking immigrants anything that's not being asked of homeless New Yorkers,” Arriola said.

Although Tung supports immigrants, she is in favor of a curfew if it's a solution that helps everyone.

“In terms of protections for immigrants, especially for them, I think it's a good idea,” Tung said.

Adams administration spokeswoman Kayla Mamelak told NBC New York that the City Council is considering all options and that no decision has yet been made on curfews.