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A newborn bird abandoned by its flock nests in the hair of a British woman for 84 days

The little bird and the woman created a close bond in no time.

Photo: William West/AFP/Getty Images

The The hair of an isolated and nostalgic English woman living in Africa has turned into a human nest for a small bird For nearly three months.

“Every day he made little ‘nests’ in my hair, in the groove of my collarbone, which filled me with awe”He told the Guardian newspaper Hannah Bourne TaylorLondon-based photographer and editor.

He continued, “She was under a curtain of hair and collected single strands with her beak, and carved them into a circle of woven threads, resembling a small nest, and then rested inside.” “I was going to let it fall apart when I finished work and start over the next day.”

Bourne Taylor and her husband Robin moved to Ghana in 2013, when he took a job there. But she has been unable to work due to visa restrictions and has few friends and neighbours.

“I was left isolated, nostalgic and without purpose,” she said. Take a break in nature.

“After a particularly strong thunderstorm (September 2018), I found a baby bird on the ground known as a tan capuchin, barely a month old,” Bourne-Taylor said.

“He was deserted by his flock. His eyes were closed and he was trembling, and he was too small to live alone. It was the size of my little finger, with rich tea biscuit-colored feathers, eyes like ink, and a beak as small as a pencil.”

The little bird and the woman created a close bond in no time.

The next day, he woke up with his mouth open and screamed of acute hunger. Termites fed him and instinctively sang to him. She screamed back and climbed into my hand, and dug into her beak and head, then fell asleep in my palm. To him, I was his mother. For the next 84 days, he lived on me.”

Tan Capuchin had grown large and strong by the end of the year and was able to join his herd.

“Every now and then, when the flocks fly, one stays on a branch and looks at me. I still cry when I think of him,” Bourne-Taylor added. “His upbringing taught me to live in the present and changed me forever,” he said. “When we returned to Oxfordshire last year, I joined a local conservation effort and wrote our story in Fledgling. This, along with the lesson any small animal can make, will be his legacy.”

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