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A Cuban immigrant, from a teacher on the island to a farmer in Canada

A Cuban immigrant, from a teacher on the island to a farmer in Canada

In the midst of the worst migration crisis in Cuba’s history, with nearly 200,000 people arriving in the United States in recent months and thousands more going to Europe to Canada, stories have emerged of Cuban immigrants being overpowered and sacrificed. Like many others, they leave the “comfort” of a professional job on the island and start from scratch far away.

This is the case of a Cuban immigrant, Zocel Osiwe, who was dedicated to the Canadian Press, as being a farmer in a rural area, near Abernethy in Canada.

When she arrived in that country, the Cuban went to town, to Regina, but she knew that she would have to start from scratch at a job so far away from her that she knew nothing of. She worked in Cuba as a physics teacher, but for 14 years she worked on a Canadian farm growing crops year after year.

“It’s a learning process, every day you learn something,” he said. Osiowy has been working on the farm for 14 years. She relied on other farm wives to help her adjust to this new life and they advised her how to learn some skills to help.

She told me I have a girlfriend, who doesn’t learn everything on the farm. And I say “why,” she says, “because then you have to do everything,” explained the Cuban woman whose daughter she lives with.

Cuban farms in Canada, how did you do that

Cuban learned to handle mix. She sat in the passenger seat and watched her husband, until one day she took the wheel herself and took the reins of the heavy machinery.

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“If you know the farmers, they just want you to go, go, go. I just take it simple and try to do my best, just to help him get rid of the crop.” pointed out.

When she’s not on a harvesting machine, she’s busy cooking for the family. The Osiowy family grows canola, wheat and flax on 2.5 quarters of the farm land.