East Africa News Post

Complete News World

They combined 200,000 photos into one photo

They combined 200,000 photos into one photo

A photographer and planetary scientist spent 9 months to put it together. The result was amazing.

astrophotographer Andrew McCarty And the world of planets Conor Mathern they took More than 200,000 images of the moon In one night, with the aim of capturing the smallest details of its surface and its colours.

The result was amazing, because in one image, obtained from all the captured images, they were able to capture it All shades of the moon range from gray, white, blue and brown.

The 174MP image captures the craters and texture of the moon in stunning detail. It was posted on social media by Americans Andrew McCarty and Connor Mathern as a “honour” ahead of NASA’s “Artemis” test mission on the moon.


Moon shades range from gray, white, blue and brown.

Arizona-based Andrew McCarthy worked with planetary scientist and space photographer Connor Matherne to create the image as a “collaborative tribute” to NASA’s upcoming Artemis mission.

He continued, “This is the highest resolution shot of the Moon I’ve ever taken, color data captured while cosmic_background captures the details. Together, we ended up with an incredibly detailed image of our lunar neighbor in stunning color.” .

All pictures were taken in one night, and the couple spent nine months editing and assembling their work for the final product. The collection is assembled like a mosaic, and each mosaic consists of thousands of images,” McCarthy said.

Now, Artemis is ready to take on lunar exploration.
Now, Artemis is ready to take on lunar exploration.

He explained that while taking thousands of photos that reveal intricate details of the lunar surface, Matheren focused on the colors of the moon, according to El Espectador de México.

See also  NASA Releases New Panoramic Image of Milky Way Center | Present

The two American astrophotographers were able to quickly go viral after capturing what they describe as a photo “ridiculously detailed” the moon.

Everything is ready for Artemis Mission 1

NASA’s Artemis mission It will take off from Cape Canaveral on August 29, and will be the first unmanned test of the Space Launch System’s ultra-heavy rocket, capable of taking humans to the moon.

They created the image as a file "Collaborative Greetings" to NASA's next Artemis mission.
They created the image as a “collaborative tribute” to NASA’s upcoming Artemis mission.

Fifty years after the last Apollo mission, the Artemis program is set to take over lunar exploration with a test launch Monday of the most powerful rocket in NASA history.

The goal is to return humans to the Moon after the 1972 Apollo mission, and eventually to Mars.

The 98-meter Space Launch System (SLS) rocket is scheduled to lift off at 8:33 a.m. (1233 GMT) from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida.

The mission, which has been planned for more than a decade, is unmanned but highly symbolic for NASA, under pressure from China and private competitors such as SpaceX.

Hotels around Cape Canaveral are filling up and between 100,000 and 200,000 spectators are expected to attend the launch event.

The massive orange and white rocket was stationed at KSC’s Launch Complex 39B for a week.

The 174MP image captures the craters and texture of the moon in stunning detail.
The 174MP image captures the craters and texture of the moon in stunning detail.

“Since it was rolled out to the platform last week, you can feel the excitement and energy,” says Janet Petrou, Director of KSC. “It’s really clear.”

See also  Looks like a Pro, but without noise canceling

The goal of the flight, christened Artemis 1, is to test the SLS system and the crew’s Orion capsule located at the front of the rocket.

Dolls equipped with sensors will take the places of the crew and record levels of acceleration, vibration and radiation. In addition, cameras will capture every moment of the 42-day flight and a “selfie” of the spacecraft will be taken with the moon and Earth in the background.

see also