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After 24 years they discovered what was the strange noise coming from the Titanic

After 24 years they discovered what was the strange noise coming from the Titanic

No one has been able to establish what a mysterious sonar “beep” near the wreck site is. Now we have the answer, and it’s unexpected.

Paul Henri Narjolet has sunk aboard the Titanic more often than most. More than 30 times in total, in fact. On one of those trips, In 1998Registered A Mysterious “beep” sound Near the wreckage.

In the decades since, no one has been able to establish what the problem was, another shipwreck, some kind of geological feature, or something entirely new.

Now, in 2022, The mystery is finally solved.


Sounds emanate from deep-sea rocks teeming with marine life, about 2,900 meters below the surface (Ocean Gate).

During a trip to the wreck of the Titanic earlier this year, Norjolet and his fellow researchers were able to detect sounds coming from deep-sea rock. It is full of marine lifeFor some 2,900 meters Below the surface, statements Scientific alert.

“We don’t know what we’re going to find,” says Narjolet. “In sonar, it could be a number of things, including another wreck.”

“I was looking for an opportunity to explore this large object that was shown on sonar a long time ago. It was amazing to explore this area and find this. Spectacular volcanic formation “Full life,” he says Scientific alert.

Researchers observed seaweeds, corals, fish, crabs and more at the top of Basalt Ridge (Ocean Gate).
Researchers observed seaweeds, corals, fish, crabs and more at the top of Basalt Ridge (Ocean Gate).

Researchers observed seaweeds, corals, fish, crabs and more at the top of the basalt ridge, tentatively named the Narjolet-Fanning Ridge.

“When I heard about the possibility of a dive to uncover the mystery seen on sonar in 1998, I knew I wanted to be a part of the effort,” says Fanning.

A city of fish in the deep

While it will take some time to review all the images and videos from recent dives, the team wants to share their findings with other scientists to improve our understanding of deep-sea life, he says. Scientific alert.

A groundbreaking piece of research aimed to determine how life forms, species concentrations, and overall ecosystems differ between the Norjolet-Fanning Ridge and the famous shipwreck on which it is located.

The remains of the Titanic.
The remains of the Titanic.

“The similarities and differences will help us better understand our deep-sea environments,” says Steve Rose, a marine scientist at the University of North Carolina and the expedition’s chief scientist.

The researchers also collected numerous samples of water that could have gone through the processes DNA analysis Environment, reports to learn more about the species we deal with in this newly discovered ridge Scientific alert.

Computer models will be used to figure out how life survives where it is: it joins ongoing efforts by scientists to learn more about how seaweeds and corals spread widely across the ocean.

All of this affects ongoing research into how climate change affects the oceans and how these delicate ecosystems can adapt and survive in warmer waters.

A mystery in 1998 "Beep sound" Sonar near the wreckage.
In 1998 a mysterious sonar “beep” was recorded near the wreck.
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“This information needs to be shared with the scientific community and policy makers to ensure these vulnerable ecosystems receive the attention and protection they deserve,” says Murray Roberts, a marine biologist at the University of Edinburgh in England. Scientific alert.

Murray’s voice can be heard in a video released by the team (below) sharing the deep-sea environment they encountered while diving in a manned submersible called the “Titan.”

Check it out too

Check it out too

Check it out too

GML